beleben

die belebende Bedenkung

Archive for the ‘gibberish’ Category

Nought out of ten

leave a comment »

One reason Richard Fisher, owner of Ten Transport Consultancy Ltd, can’t wait for HS2 to be built is that he can’t wait for the day when he’s not following mixed traffic at walking pace [on the railway] between Coventry and Birmingham!

twitter, @RichRichbaboon, 'One reason I can’t wait for HS2 to be built is that I can’t wait for the day when I’m not following mixed traffic at walking pace between Coventry and Birmingham!'

It looks like Mr Fisher will be in for a very long wait. Because HS2 would not eliminate mixed traffic on the railway between Coventry and Birmingham.

SLC Rail, Coventry - Birmingham timetable structure in 2013

If HS2 were built, the legacy two-track line via Stechford and Hampton in Arden would still need to accommodate fast and stopping passenger services, as well as freight.

High Speed Two would release virtually no capacity between Birmingham New Street, Birmingham International, and Coventry.

Even if it were possible, removing fast trains from the classic line would not be a desirable objective.

Centro, Coventry line HS2 connectivity, 2014

‘Eliminating mixed traffic’ would mean anyone travelling between Coventry and Birmingham having to endure a somewhat tedious ride on the stopping trains.

Advertisements

Written by beleben

May 31, 2019 at 12:50 pm

Posted in gibberish, HS2

Closely observed trains

with 2 comments

There is “no question that if you take a fast train off a main line, you make room for a couple more slow trains… we could have great deal more commuting capacity into London“, claimed ‘Modern Railways’ writer Ian Walmsley (interviewed by Kelvin McKenzie about HS2, on Lovesport radio on 8 February 2019).

twitter, @RAIL, 'This'

Actually, removing a ‘fast’ train might create less than (not ‘more than’) one path for ‘slow’ trains. This can be seen in slide #6 in Professor Andrew McNaughton’s ‘Released Capacity’ presentation (2015), where stopping Train #3 requires three technical paths (not ‘less than one’ fast path). The number of train paths available in a mixed traffic situation will vary, depending on a number of factors.

Andrew McNaughton, diagram of 2 fast trains being followed by a slow one

Slide #13 from Prof McNaughton’s presentation (2015) demonstrated that HS2 would not allow a doubling or tripling of the number of trains on the West Coast Main Line.

Andrew McNaughton, indicative HS2 and WCML service pattern, February 2015 Released Capacity slide 13

Written by beleben

February 19, 2019 at 8:04 pm

£24 billion is not enough

leave a comment »

Transport for the North ‘today released its latest research into the boost Northern powerhouse rail could give local economies’, the Liverpool Echo reported.

Tim Wood with Chris Grayling MP

[Liverpool Echo, 17 Oct 2018]

[Tim Wood, programme director at Transport for the North,] said the National Infrastructure Commission had positively assessed the plans.

He said: £24bn is their estimate [of the cost of Northern powerhouse rail]. We know it will cost a little bit more than that.

Liverpool Echo, Liverpool NPR could take decades, 16 Jan 2018

'New rail line means better job prospects - if you are willing to commute for up to three hours a day', Ian Johnson, Newcastle Chronicle, 17 Oct 2018

Written by beleben

October 17, 2018 at 2:54 pm

Brushed with oil, dusted with powder

leave a comment »

Stephen Sutcliffe, Head of Northern Powerhouse Rail Development at Transport for the North (TfN) has, apparently, been ‘outlining the benefits’ of NPR at a rail conference today.

twitter, @ProjectAdam1, 'Listening to Steve Sutcliffe from @Transport4North outlining the benefits of #NPR 1.3m people within 60 mins of 4 economic centres, an increase in £100bn GVA... a must for the north of England'

This “NPR brings 1.3 million people in the north within 60 minutes of 4 economic centres” malarkey. What does it mean? How would it be possible?

When asked to provide details, TfN go all evasive. Because what they are offering, is snake oil, and monkey dust.

Written by beleben

October 4, 2018 at 12:08 pm

Useless nonsense perspective

with one comment

Apparently, ‘Rail’ magazine is going to start a sort of ‘fact checking’ service for claims on social media.

Perhaps they should begin with some of the factoids put about by their ‘technical expert’, Gareth Dennis.

Gareth Dennis onabout

Thameslink ‘current’ peak system capacity is 24 trains per hour in each direction? Not on their nelly. Whether that will be reliably achievable with the proposed service pattern, is open to question.

Which bits of the Metropolitan line see 36 trains per hour?

And how does Crossrail ‘currently’ do 24? It hasn’t even opened yet.

twitter, @GarethDennis, useful technical perspective?

In any case, throughput on a metro-type railway is not going to be any kind of guide to capacity on a 360 km/h intercity railway like HS2.

Written by beleben

August 9, 2018 at 10:50 am

Midland Metro will become West Midlands Metro as services are taken over by Midland Metro

leave a comment »

'From Sunday June 24 [2018], the Midland Metro will become West Midlands Metro as services are taken over by Midland Metro'

It makes perfect sense in the twilight zone

Written by beleben

June 21, 2018 at 10:34 pm

Released capacity for Whitlocks End

leave a comment »

According to Midlands Connect, HS2 will release capacity on the Derby to Stoke railway, Birmingham’s Cross-City line, and, er, the North Warwickshire line.

midlands-connect-hs2-hub-measures-released-capacity

This suggests that Midlands Connect does not understand what ‘released capacity’ is.

Perhaps not too surprising, given that they seem to think running a bubble car between Leamington Spa and Coventry once an hour is a ‘step change in capacity in the NUCKLE corridor’.

Written by beleben

May 16, 2018 at 9:12 am

Posted in gibberish, HS2