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Adder nuff Midlands Connect capacity nonsense

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The 2+3 seat version of the 5-car Bombardier trainsets on order for the West Midlands franchise has a standard class seating capacity of ~426, giving a 10-car total of ~852, according to the Department for Transport

‘HS2 all the way’ is needed because is needed because ‘the 17:46 from Euston to Crewe [commuter train] has an average “load factor” (capacity) of 214%. Upgrading the WCML [West Coast Main Line] directly disrupts all of these passengers and thousands more for years and provides only minor improvements’, according to David Blackadder-Weinstein, from Midlands Connect.

twitter, @weinsteinlinder, 'Welcome aboard the country’s most overcrowded service. The 17:46 from Euston to Crewe has an average “load factor” (capacity) of 214%. Upgrading the WCML directly disrupts all of these passengers and thousands more for years and provides only minor improvements.'

This ‘214%’ figure comes from the Department for Transport’s ‘Rail passenger numbers and crowding on weekdays in major cities in England and Wales: 2018’ report, so it is historic, rather than current, data. This publication included a list of the 10 ‘busiest peak trains’ in England and Wales in autumn 2018, but noted ‘These trains make up a small fraction of all services and do not represent general conditions on the railway’.

The Beleben blog has pointed out that HS2 is simply not required to address commuter demand on the West Coast Main Line. All commuter demand into and out of Euston can be accommodated by using space-efficient rolling stock. This is the approach being adopted for the busiest commuter railways into London – on the former Southern and Eastern regions.

The 2+3 seat version of the 5-car Bombardier trainsets on order for the West Midlands franchise has a standard class seating capacity of ~426, giving a 10-car total of ~852. There seems to be no reason why a future ’17:46 to Crewe’ could not be operated with a train of this sort, given that (i) most platforms are already long enough, and (ii) platform lengthening is generally the lowest-cost way of increasing capacity.

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Written by beleben

September 9, 2019 at 11:24 am

Posted in HS2, Railways

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