beleben

die belebende Bedenkung

Beleben visits some fake HS2 claims

with 2 comments

“Just outside Paddington” is a vast building site turning a run down industrial area and old railway depot into Old Oak HS2 railway station, according to the IanVisits blog (20 Aug 2019), which was given site access to take pictures of dumper trucks and rubble.

twitter, @ianvisits, 'Taking a look at HS2's huge Old Oak Common station' … Just outside Paddington is a vast building site - turning a run down industrial area and old railway depot into a major HS2 railway station.

According to the IV blogpost, “The biggest problem affecting the railways today is a lack of capacity to handle the surging numbers of people who want to travel by train. So something needs to be done. Yes, they could upgrade the existing lines, but that was tried with the West Coast Mainline Upgrade, and it delivered a fairly modest upgrade at a massive £14.5 billion cost.”

Ian Visits, 'the West Coast Mainline Upgrade delivered a fairly modest upgrade at a massive £14.5 billion cost'

The West Coast Route Modernisation did not cost £14.5 billion, and its upgrade component (£2.5 billion) enabled large increases in capacity (e.g., London to Manchester intercity went from one train per hour, to three).

DfT: WCML modernisation had an upgrade component of £2.5 billion

At Euston, “it’s about fixing the bottleneck on the approach to the station”, according to the IV blog.

Ian Visits, 'Building not just more platforms for HS2, but critically, the extra tunnels for those trains to use shifts intercity services to the HS2 line, releasing lots of capacity in the old tunnels for suburban services.If that doesn’t sound too important, then where’s the UK’s most congested train… it’s the 17:46 out of Euston which carries more than twice the number of passengers that it’s designed for.'

[Taking a look at HS2’s huge Old Oak Common station, Ian Visits blog, 20 Aug 2019]

The station has enough platforms, but not enough railway tracks to get in and out, so trains have to wait for space in the tunnels to get into the station. And back out again. That’s a huge impediment to increasing the numbers of trains that commuters from North London and beyond can use.

Building not just more platforms for HS2, but critically, the extra tunnels for those trains to use shifts intercity services to the HS2 line, releasing lots of capacity in the old tunnels for suburban services.If that doesn’t sound too important, then where’s the UK’s most congested train… it’s the 17:46 out of Euston which carries more than twice the number of passengers that it’s designed for. When completed, HS2 is expected to more than double the number of seats out of Euston station during peak hours.

Actually, constructing HS2 into Euston appears to require a permanent reduction in classic capacity into the station. There is no sign of a “releasing lots of capacity in the old tunnels for suburban services”.

HS2 Ltd, changes to Euston approach tracks

Crowding on Euston commuter trains is not a problem best addressed by spending £60 to £105 (?) billion on HS2. The first go-to should be the use of space efficient rolling stock, as on Thameslink and Greater Anglia. If the 17:46 out of Euston in 2018 had been operated by a 10-carriage Greater Anglia ‘Aventra’, what would the load factor have been ?

Greater Anglia, new commuter trains

[Taking a look at HS2’s huge Old Oak Common station, Ian Visits blog, 20 Aug 2019]

It’s been badly branded as a high-speed line — derided as shaving a few insignificant minutes off trips for rich businessmen. No one ever seems to complain about making it easier for families visiting each other, it’s always the rich business men.

The HS2 business case is built around time savings for business users, and a supposed shortage of capacity in the peaks. How many families travel by rail, in the peaks, to visit each other?

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Written by beleben

August 20, 2019 at 10:50 am

2 Responses

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  1. I think that the biggest risk with HS2 is the ability of the DfT to deliver for ordinary people trying to access jobs,shops,schools.There is no point in releasing capacity on the classic network if the Treasury is not going to fund the monies required to use spare train paths .People have lost faith in govt and big institutions to deliver for them so the default position is companies like HS2 are just spinning half truths.Looking at the evidence of the last 20 years the DfT has preferred to allocate resources not to local transport but to long distance London oriented traffic flows .The treasury prefer this approach as they hope to benefit from the payment of a premium by train operators like Virgin

    David Gaule

    August 20, 2019 at 11:07 am

  2. By far the best move for Euston is to put the DC services underground at Primrose Hill (Camden Junction) and use the existing dive under junction to also connect with inner (stopping) AC services. Bringing all in to a new Station built to be a through station using the route as envisaged in 1930’s London Transport Underground Modernisation, and partially built already alongside Tottenham Court Road.

    Linking the DC’s Watford Junction-Clapham Junction (& on to Wimbledon via East Putney) or to run round via Deptford Loop offering more capacity and the resilience of a second route for many commuters. The AC’s might run on to Ashford, Reading, Gatwick.

    The new platforms at Euston would sit to the West and distribute the commuter traffic to 3 Tube stations*, clear of the long distance concourse, with circulation space designed appropriately, and at long last properly connecting Euston Square Station with …Euston Square. *Euston, Euston Square, Warren Street

    A second Crossrail connection (Tottenham Court Road) provides resilience and a second route from the Euston Road ‘trio’ of main line stations, especially if a problem arises at Farringdon.

    Charing Cross could release the train-shed as a valuable West End site, and operate 4 through platforms, enabling train regulation on the core tunnels.

    d9015

    August 24, 2019 at 2:22 am


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