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The roll of comparison

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Ever wondered why UK railway electrification costs were high compared to the rest of Europe (aside from issues like density of use of the network), and if a rolling programme of electrification could reduce costs? A graph of annual kilometres electrified in the UK and Germany might start to explain the answers, @NoelDolphin suggested.

twitter, @NoelDolphin, 'Ever wondered why UK electrification costs were high compared to rest of Europe (aside from issues like density of use of our network), and if a rolling programme of electrification could reduce costs. This graph might start to explain the answers'

In Mr Dolphin’s UK – Germany graph, it is not immediately obvious whether ‘kilometres’ means route-km or track-km, or whether ‘Germany’ pre-1991 includes the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). In the 1980s, the Deutsche Reichsbahn der DDR (DR) stepped up electrification of main lines across the country (not westwards, for political reasons).

Stamps_of_Germany_DDR_1985,_MiNr_2970 (Wikipedia)

Regarding the UK plot, questions might arise from the exclusion of HS1 and the effective  ‘re-electrification’ of significant portions of the West Coast Main Line, under its modernisation programme.

Written by beleben

May 18, 2018 at 10:26 am

Posted in Railways

One Response

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  1. You might want to follow this up with a comparison across the internal UK border, where we’ve gad the rolling EGIP (Edinburgh-Glasgow Improvement Project) steadily ‘ticking off’ wired routes, in a strategically competent sequence, with some key milestones delivered in ways that provide key examples of how to avoid the mess that has dogged so much work in the South

    Good project scoping delivered the Paisley Canal electrification for less than 50% of the initial estimates involving bridge rebuilding etc, with only a 9 week blockade for the unavoidable track regrading of a single track railway.

    The delivery of the electrified Airdrie-Bathgate reopening, plus the loop-through facility delivered by the Anniesland-Maryhill reconnection and its later linking-in to enable the 6 month closure of Queen Street High Level with minimal impact on services, running some trains from Glasgow Central (via Whifflet) and others looping round through Queen Street Low Level

    Even before completion, the system showed its mettle, when the key ‘fast’ route was blocked by a wall collapse, and passengers largely diverted to the slightly slower alternative. The delayed delivery of the newest electric trains (Class 385) has also posed problems, but a combination of offering a special fare to used the Low Level services, and swiftly securing recently off-lease Class 365 trains to plug the gap, as the diesel trains went off lease (as planned) and went to Northern to deliver their May timetable changes. Rellu its working in Scotland just need to get that stable strategy working for England.

    d9015

    May 20, 2018 at 6:36 pm


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