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Linking Liverpool with HS2, part four

with 5 comments

On 3 March, the publicly-funded HS2 Linking Liverpool PR campaign announced that ‘High Speed Rail proposals put forward by Liverpool City Region will deliver a £10 billion boost to the local economy’, according to a new report ‘released’ on that day.

'HS2 Linking Liverpool' PR campaign announcement, 03 Mar 2016

At the time of writing, the ‘new report’ was not available on the ‘Linking Liverpool’ website. However, a Steer Davies Gleave report dated July 2014, was available.

'HS2 Linking Liverpool' PR campaign 'independent' economics study July 2014, extracts

The July 2014 report stated that building a high speed line into Liverpool could reduce the ‘best’ time to London by 24 minutes, to 72 minutes, and result in a Gross Value Added uplift of  £459 million (see ‘Increase in GVA’ in Table 1 above). The Linking Liverpool campaign attempted to portray the uplift as £8,342 million, and now they are saying £10,000 million.

Linking Liverpool are continuing to claim there are tens of thousands of people who can’t be bothered to visit the city now, but who would visit if the (London) journey time was all of 24 minutes shorter. Altogether, these ‘easily distracted’ visitors would make three quarters of a million trips to Liverpool.

So, the usual crazy nonsense. In the view of the Beleben blog, the capital cost of extending HS2 into Liverpool Lime Street would be around £4,000 million. If the Liverpool HS2 spur was also used to run ‘HS3’ trains to Manchester, there would be further costs on top.

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Written by beleben

March 5, 2016 at 10:11 am

Posted in HS2, Liverpool

5 Responses

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  1. “Linking Liverpool are continuing to claim there are tens of thousands of people who can’t be bothered to visit the city now, but who would visit if the (London) journey time was all of 24 minutes shorter. Altogether, these ‘easily distracted’ visitors would make three quarters of a million trips to Liverpool.”

    HS2 Ltd are saying the same about Manchester, that a high-speed line will increase visitors.
    To ensure take up of HS2, the HS2 station need excellent, and fast, rail access. Liverpool has a metro, underground in Liverpool and Birkenhead, called Merseyrail – the only other cities to underground metros are: London, Glasgow and Newcastle. The metro needs parts of it extended and battery trains are being considered to run off electrified track onto unelectrified track. Central station needs enlarging ASAP as at times it is dangerously overcrowded. The many tunnels under the city can be brought back into use. This gives Liverpool the best access to HS2, if it ever goes to Liverpool, than any other provincial city – by a mile!
    The Liverpool City Region is approx 2.2 million.

    Liverpool’s mayor it emphasising that the rail freight out of the port of Liverpool will increase by 300%. A new post-Panamax container ship terminal is to open soon taking ships with 20,000 containers on board. The new port eco biomass facility has just come on line using rail to feed powers stations, with a view to expand to other stations. This all needs more rail. Then HMGs move to take freight off the roads onto rail. Then more rail again. Then the turn back to manufacturing after the move to off-shore to China is not deemed to be not that wise. Then more port and rail activity. The port of Liverpool is the North of England’s deep water port, the only one on that coast, and very important to the economies of the North of England and even the Midlands. The world largest container line, the Maersk Line, have moved their UK head office to Liverpool from London.

    Northern Powerhouse Rail stated they want a new line run into Liverpool. The mayor of Liverpool, via ResRepublica, want this HS2 line, which will be built to high-speed standards as per the norm, to branch into the North-South HS2 line – all common sense.

    The case for connecting Liverpool to release rail capacity for freight alone is overwhelming.

    John Burns

    March 7, 2016 at 12:54 pm

    • The year 2014 population of Liverpool City Region according to Merseytravel, was estimated as 1.52 million.

      As for the rest of your claims, I would suggest examining the actual evidence. It’s on this blog.

      beleben

      March 7, 2016 at 1:08 pm

      • Merseyside was to take in Chester, and west Cheshire. The Tory Heath government cut it by about half in area after it was all cleaned and dried through the commissions. Merseyside does not even cover the whole banks of the Mersey estuary it is so small. It has a strange name and generally meaningless. The Liverpool City Region is now a recognised body, proposed by Halton which is not in Merseyside. The reality of the outstretching economy is that the LCR is just over 2 million. Hesseltine and O’Leary did a report on Liverpool and put the population of the LCR at 2.2 million. After London Liverpool is the most productive per hour worked.

        I did look at your “evidence” and was not convinced. The “evidence” does not project ahead and knows nothing about the rapidly expanding Port of Liverpool. The “evidence” is too train-spotterish.

        John Burns

        March 7, 2016 at 2:07 pm

      • I did look at your “evidence” and was not convinced.

        I said look at the evidence. Not at “my” evidence.

        Merseytravel say “1.52 million” population (not me).

        MDS Transmodal say modest freight flows (not me).

        And Linking Liverpool say: £459 million Gross Value Added uplift from a new line into Liverpool (not me).

        The likely costs vastly exceed the likely benefits.

        beleben

        March 7, 2016 at 6:15 pm

  2. […] put forward by Liverpool City Region will deliver a £10 billion boost to the local economy’, according to a new report supposedly ‘released’ on that […]


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