beleben

die belebende Bedenkung

The ‘One North’ report, July 2014

with 4 comments

In his latest report for government, Rebalancing Britain: From HS2 towards a national transport strategy, [HS2 chairman David] Higgins called for the One North plan, developed by five northern cities to improve the connectivity of the region, to be built into a government-backed transport plan (reported Public Finance, 21 Nov 2014).

One North report, July 2014, page 1

One North report, July 2014, pages 2 and 3

One North report, July 2014, pages 4 and 5

One North report, July 2014, pages 6 and 7

One North report, July 2014, pages 8 and 9

One North report, July 2014, pages 10 and 11

One North report, July 2014, pages 12 and 13

One North report, July 2014, pages 14 and 15

One North report, July 2014, pages 16 and 17

One North report, July 2014, pages 18 and 19

One North report, July 2014, pages 20 and 21

One North report, July 2014, page 22 and 23

One North report, July 2014, pages 24 and 25

One North report, July 2014, pages 26 and 27

One North report, July 2014, page 28 and 29

One North report, July 2014, pages 30 and 31

One North report, July 2014, pages 32 and 33

One North report, July 2014, pages 34 and 35

How is it possible to build a plan on the One North report? It’s full of nonsense ideas, such as a bad-weather rail shuttle under the Pennines for lorries.

Advertisements

Written by beleben

November 21, 2014 at 2:22 pm

Posted in High speed rail, HS2

Tagged with ,

4 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Michael Wand

    November 21, 2014 at 4:26 pm

  2. “How is it possible to build a plan on the One North report? It’s full of nonsense ideas, such as a bad-weather rail shuttle under the Pennines for lorries.”

    Could you explain why that idea is bad? I would guess that you have never driven upon the Woodhead pass route, or the Stocksbridge bypass that follows it – One of the most dangerous roads in Britain for many years – mostly as a consequence of the huge number of trucks that use it to get to junction 35a on the M1.

    The route itself is entirely single-lane for the majority of the route, with the exception of a crawler lane if you are traveling westward on the east side of the hills. Getting rid of the lorries would be fantastic.

    Andrew S. Mooney

    November 21, 2014 at 7:10 pm

    • Unfortunately, providing a short-distance rolling highway under the Pennines probably wouldn’t make much difference to safety on the roads above, or the number of HGVs using them.

      beleben

      November 22, 2014 at 11:33 am

  3. For an extra challenge don’t just count the lorries, count the vans as well as the the number of left and right corners:

    Andrew S. Mooney

    November 21, 2014 at 7:44 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: